Analog Synthesizers

Image of a Minimoog

What are ANALOG synthesizers?

An analog (or analogue) synthesizer is a synthesizer that uses analog circuits and analog signals to generate sound electronically.

The earliest analog synthesizers in the 1920s and 1930s, such as the Trautonium, were built with a variety of vacuum-tube (thermionic valve) and electro-mechanical technologies. After the 1960s, analog synthesizers were built using operational amplifier (op-amp) integrated circuits, and used potentiometers (pots, or variable resistors) to adjust the sound parameters. Analog synthesizers also use low-pass filters and high-pass filters to modify the sound. While 1960s-era analog synthesizers such as the Moog used a number of independent electronic modules connected by patch cables, later analog synthesizers such as the Minimoog integrated them into single units, eliminating patch cords in favour of integrated signal routing systems.
Read more at Wikipedia.org »

Image of a Moog MiniMoog Model DMoog Minimoog Model D

Historically, the Minimoog is considered the very first synthesizer for musicians! Compact, affordable, simplified and based on the megalithic modular Moog synths, the Minimoog became the most popular synth of all time, and still is to this day! Prior to the Minimoog, synthesizers were custom built to order, and required a great deal of technical knowledge to be able to wire up and create a sound. The Minimoog changed all that by hard-wiring the most basic but essential of components into a compact keyboard any musician could not only play, but dial up some great sounds on! Thus, the Minimoog was the first synthesizer to show up on the shelves of music stores around the world.
Read more at Vintagesynth.com »

Image of a ARP 2500ARP 2500

In 1969 ARP Instruments was formed by Alan R. Pearlman, an electronics engineer inspired by what the Moog synthesizer was doing, particularly after hearing the now famous Wendy Carlos album, “Switched on Bach”. In 1970, ARP introduced its first modular synthesizer, the model 2500. As with almost everything ARP did during its existence, the 2500 was designed in direct competition with the Moog synthesizers that were garnering most of the attention at the time.
Read more at Vintagesynth.com »

Image of a Roland System 700Roland Jupiter 8

The Jupiter-8 was Roland's first truly professional analog synthesizer. The Jupiter-8 features 16 rich analog oscillators at 2 per voice, eight voice polyphony and easy programming! At eight voices you can get some pretty thick analog sounds. Easy and intuitive programming via front panel sliders, knobs and buttons for all your tweaking needs. The legacy of the Jupiter synthesizers is due to their unique voice architecture and design, creating sounds that were so unreal and amazing that they have to be heard! No other synths in the world can create analog sounds as cool and authentic as these.
Read more at Vintagesynth.com »